Search

Writings by Andrea Watts

Articles on sustainable forestry, agriculture, and other topics

Tag

Washington

Finding Success in the Residuals Market

 

TimberWest
March/April 2018

Three times a day, a residual hauler from Sierra Pacific, Interstate Wood Products, or Veneer Chip Transport visits Gem Shavings’ new Shelton facility to deliver an average of 175 cubic yards of wood shavings. Usually a couple days later, these wood shavings leave Gem Shavings either as bales or in bulk, and are en route to feed stores in the Pacific Northwest or Thoroughbred farms in California and around the world. Read more…

Advertisements

River food webs: Incorporating nature’s invisible fabric into river management

 

U.S. Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station Science Findings
April 2018

Increasing the population of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in Washington state’s Methow River is a goal of the Upper Columbia Spring Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Recovery Plan. Spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead are listed as endangered and threatened, respectively, under the Endangered Species Act.

Installing logjams and reconnecting the river to its floodplain are management actions being undertaken to restore salmon habitat. However, researchers with the U.S. Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station, the U.S. Geological Survey, and Idaho State University found that focusing solely on physical habitat restoration overlooks the importance of maintaining the food webs supporting all river life. Read more…

Father and Son Carry on Family Tradition

TimberWest
September/October 2017

Being a crew of two means father-son team J.D and J.R. Boehme find themselves switching between equipment and tasks while on a job site, but that suits them just fine.
In fact, a two-man team is keeping with the tradition that began nearly 40 years ago when J.D.’s father, Don, started Boehme and Son Logging Inc. Their motto is Keep it small and keep it in the family. Read more…

There’s carbon in them thar hills: But how much? Could Pacific Northwest forests store more?

U.S. Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station Science Findings
April 2017

As a signatory to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United States annually compiles a report on the nation’s carbon flux—the amount of carbon emitted into the atmosphere compared to the amount stored by terrestrial landscapes. Forests store vast amounts of carbon, but it’s not fully understood how a forest’s storage capacity fluctuates as stands age or respond to disturbance. Read more…

NDC Timber Inc. – 30 Years of Corporate and Environmental Responsibility


TimberWest
November/December 2013

In John Evans’ opinion, tower logging has the better views, and as a forest engineer for NDC Timber Inc. who has spent nearly 30 years overseeing high-country tower logging operations throughout Grays Harbor, Mason and Pacific counties, and southeast Alaska, he would know. Read more…

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑